Lectures

Bachelor's lectures and courses

The lecture considers general properties and their trends, modifications, preparation, uses, and chemistry of the nonmetals and metals in elemental form. In addition, the preparation and properties of hydrogen compounds, oxides, oxoacids, and halides of the nonmetals are covered using simple, selected examples, incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic concepts.  Conceptually, structure of matter, molecular orbitals, MO schemes of diatomic molecules (H2, F2, O2, N2), structures (VSEPR method), bonding ratios as well as redox processes and electrochemistry, crystal structures, semiconductors, material properties, as well as natural cycles and environmental aspects (ex. Ozone, CO2, NOx, elements) will be covered, as well as the chemistry of transition metals in aqueous solution, the fundamentals of complex chemistry (formation and stability of metal complexes, introduction to ligand field theory, complex geometries and isomerism, ligand types). All course contents are underpinned by demonstration experiments.

You can find more information about the lecture "Inorganc Chemistry I, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

Module 1 complex chemistry (Bayer-Skoff): Bonding in metal complexes; electronic structure of transition metal complexes; derived optical and magnetic properties. Ligand substitution reactions.

Module 2 organometallic chemistry (Kirchner): Methods for the synthesis of organometallic compounds of the main group elements (especially Li, Mg, Al, Si and P) and the transition metals. Types of organometallic ligands (metal-ligand bonding), metal-carbon single and multiple bonds. Basic reactions in organometallic chemistry: oxidative addition / reductive elimination, insertion and elimination reactions, ligand reactivity. Simple examples for organometallic compounds in homogeneous catalysis.

Module 3 main group chemistry (Bayer-Skoff): Specialities in the chemistry of the semi-metals, especially boron and silicon. High- and low-coordinated main group compounds and their role in reaction sequences. Chemistry of carbides and nitrides. Inorganic polymers (silicones, phosphazenes). Metal-organic compounds (alkoxides).

You can find more information about the lecture "Inorganic Chemistry II, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

Synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds according to different mechanisms and using different working techniques as well as characterization of the compounds by different methods. The compounds are organized in thematic complexes, whereby the student is assigned individual examples from a group of methodologically similar syntheses.

The program includes the syntheses of organic compounds by nucleophilic or radical substitution, addition or elimination, reduction or oxidation, aromatic substitution, condensation, diazotization and a transformation of/to a carbonyl or carboxyl derivative. A compound thereof is to be prepared on a semi-microscale. Furthermore, a mixture of substances is to be separated and the pure substances contained therein identified, a natural substance is to be isolated and a reaction with an organometallic reagent is to be carried out. In the field of inorganic synthesis selected substance classes of inorganic and metal-organic chemistry are synthesized: simple metal complexes, molecular inorganic compounds of the main group elements, the use of Li- or Mg-organyls in inorganic chemistry and metal-organic compounds of transition metals (metal carbonyls, sandwich complexes etc.).

All products are characterized by suitable spectroscopic and/or chromatographic methods. Important points are also environmental awareness and disposal of by-products. Before each product is prepared, a discussion must be held. ECTS credits are assigned to the individual subject areas as follows: Inorganic chemistry 5.5 credits, organic chemistry 9.5 credits.

You can find more information about the internship "Synthesis Laboratory Course, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

Master's lectures and courses

Subject of the course

The first part of this Lecture will introduce the concept of molecular recognition, overview major forces of molecular self-assembly and cover several important historical milestones of the field such as the recent Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016. We will cover many textbook examples of self-assembled systems including molecular (crown ethers, cyclodextrine and calixarenes)  as well as biological (proteins, DNA) systems and slowly go up in complexity. Following examples will present self-assembled systems of various dimentionalities: 0D (micelles, fullerenes), 1D (carbon nanotubes), 2D (self-assembled monolayers, Langmuir-Blodgett films, graphene) and 3D (block copolymers, liquid crystals). We will spend much time trying to classify and sort out non-covalent interactions (e.g. van der Waals forces) that are very imporant in the world of molecular self-assembly. At the end of this first part, we will look at the self-assembly of inorganic nanoparticles and talk about metal organic frameworks. The course will introduce you to a number of practical examples where molecular self-assembly made it way to applications and devices.

The second part of the Lecture will introduce you to various photoactive materials such as photovoltaics (PV), light emitting diodes (LED), lasers, photocatalysts and phosphors. The aim is to develop your understanding of the materials design and materials requirements for each of these applications.  We will start by discussing the nature of the light-to-matter interactions and sort out the concepts or color, transparency and opaqueness, absorption and reflectance, refraction and birefringence to understand the principles and limitations of various photoactive materials. We will further link this knowledge with the band theory of solid state materials and review the concept of metals, semiconductors and insulators. Particular focus will be devoted to history, basic principles, materials, limitations and perspectives of solar cells, photocatalysis and light emitting diodes. 

To participate in the course, online TISS registration is required. If not possible for you or you are not a TU Wien student - email Dr. Alexey Cherevan. You can find more information about the lecture "Molecule-based and self-assembled materials, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

This course provides fundamental knowledge of the chemistry and physics of nanostructured materials and their potential applications. Emphasis is on:

  • Synthesis of nanostructures by chemical processes.
  • Physical causes of nano-effects
  • Molecular self-assembly with examples for 0D to 3D systems
  • Application and deepening of methods adapted to the subject matter for the characterization of nanomaterials
  • Evaluation of properties and investigation with respect to selected applications
  • Relationship between the properties of nanomaterials and their applications

You can find more information about the lecture "Chemistry of nanomaterials, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

After successful completion of the course, students are able to design a material for a given application, i.e. bearing a set of properties required for the application. This includes the capability (i) to conceive the synthesis of a desired  material, (ii) conceive the processing of a desired material. 

Ultimate learning goal: At the end of this lecture, the students shall be able to design a material for a given application, i.e. bearing a set of properties required for the application. This includes the capability (i) to conceive the synthesis of a desired  material, (ii) conceive the processing of a desired material.

Intermediate learning goals: At the end of the lecture, the students shall

  1. know and understand what a material is 
  2. know the most important materials properties 
  3. understand which molecular and intermolecular features lead to these materials properties = be able to explain structure-property relationships 
  4. be able to identify materials featuring a certain set of properties in the materials space
  5. know the major bulk states (crystalline vs. amorphous) and how to synthesize materials in either of the state as a function of the type of material. Know how to analyze if the desired state has been achieved. 
  6. know and understand how materials can be further fine tuned by (nano-/micro-) structuring. 
  7. know and understand how to combine materials properties (composites, hybrids) at different size scales and complexity levels

Subject of course

Chapter1: Basics of materials (definitions of materials;  materials properties; structure-property relationships) 

Chapter2:  Synthesis of bulk materials (crystalline vs. amorphous solids; synthesis of crystalline solids from solution/melt/gas/solid state; synthesis of amorphous solids from solution/melt/gas/solid state) 

Chapter3: Structuring of materials (nano- and microstructuring; porous materials)

Chapter4: Combination of materials (hybrids, composites)

You can find more information about the lecture "Synthesis of Inorganic Materials, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

After successful completion of the course, students are able to describe and to apply the different techniques required for preparing, characterizing and investigating properties of advanced ceramics.

Subject of course

Preparation and characterization of ceramic materials

Processing of ceramics incl. thin film processing

Products and their properties emphasizing electrical and electrochemcal properties (e.g. of a fuel cells)

You can find more information about the course "Advanced ceramics and electrochemistry, opens an external URL in a new window" on TISS.

Other talks and lectures

Prof. Dr. D. Eder

Handouts

Illustration of articial photosynthesis

In his talk, opens an external URL in a new window, Alexey Cherevan focuses on the idea of artificial photosynthesis – a process that aims to mimic the functions of biological systems by creating human-made materials able to convert water and carbon dioxide into useful chemicals relying solely on the energy of light. He discusses the capabilities and complexity of natural photosynthesis and shows how material scientists can be inspired by nature to recreate the process.